What Are Weekend Migraines?

“Weekend migraine” is a term used to describe migraine headaches that often occur specifically on weekends or during periods of relaxation after a stressful week. While the exact cause of weekend migraines is not fully understood, there are several factors that may contribute to their occurrence:

    1. Stress Relief: After a stressful week of work or school, individuals may experience a drop in stress hormones such as cortisol. This sudden relaxation can sometimes trigger migraines in susceptible individuals.
    2. Changes in Routine: Weekends often involve changes in routine, including alterations in sleep patterns, meal times, and hydration levels. These changes can disrupt the body’s internal clock and trigger migraines in some people.
    3. Altered Caffeine Intake: Changes in caffeine consumption habits, such as drinking more or less coffee on weekends, can trigger migraines in individuals who are sensitive to caffeine.
    4. Environmental Triggers: Weekend activities may expose individuals to different environmental triggers such as changes in weather, exposure to strong odors, or fluctuations in barometric pressure, all of which can precipitate migraines.
    5. Relaxation Headaches: Paradoxically, relaxation itself can sometimes trigger headaches or migraines in certain individuals. This phenomenon is known as a “let-down” headache and can occur when stress levels decrease suddenly.

Managing weekend migraines involves identifying and avoiding triggers, maintaining a consistent routine, staying hydrated, getting adequate sleep, and managing stress levels through relaxation techniques or stress management strategies. If weekend migraines are severe or occur frequently, it’s essential to consult a healthcare professional for proper diagnosis and treatment.

 

A migraine attack is far more than just a bad headache! A severe headache, lasting from 4 – 72 hours, is just one of the horrible symptoms of migraine. Suffers also experience a range of accompanying symptoms, such as feeling sick, even vomiting in some cases, visual disturbances or extreme sensitivity to lights, smells or sounds. A migraine attack can leave the person exhausted afterwards, sometimes for a few days.

There are different triggers for the onset of migraine symptoms. For some people it’s a particular food or drink, such as cheese or red wine. For others there’s a pattern of monthly or weekly migraines. Many people link their migraines to stress. A fairly common pattern, and one that I experienced myself, is the weekend migraine. This is where the migraine happens at the weekend, or on a day off work or at the start of a holiday.

Imagine carrying heavy shopping bags in both hands, after a long day’s shopping. You’ve just left your local Marks and Spencer and the car is parked way off in the local multi-story. By the time you’re half way to the car park, the bag handles are digging painfully into your fingers, but you can’t put the bags down now because the ground is wet. So you speed up to get back to the car as quickly as possible. Your fingers are numb by now. When you finally find the car, at last you can let go of the heavy bags – relief! But then the pain, as the blood returns to your bone-white fingers!

This is my image of the weekend migraine. During the busy working week, we are dealing with a heavy workload and may not be able to stop when we’d like to. Without realising it, our whole body is getting increasingly tense, with our neck and shoulders the tightest place of all.

When the weekend comes and we can at last let go and relax – relief! But then the pain as the blood supply returns to the cranium (the part of the skull around the brain)!

For immediate relief from the symptoms, many people take an over-the-counter product from their local pharmacy, such as paracetamol and codeine. Others need a prescription from their GP and it’s a good idea to have a medical check-up if your symptoms are severe or persistent.

In order to treat the underlying cause of the condition, many people now use holistic treatments. The treatment that I recommend is the one that worked for me! It’s called craniosacral therapy and it’s bliss! The practitioner uses gentle hands-on contact at your head and neck, while you are lying down in your comfortable clothes and nothing else to do but relax. You might dose off, or you might want to chat during your treatment. Whatever you do you will feel wonderfully relaxed and refreshed afterwards.

Give it a try. You might even begin to enjoy pain-free, energy-filled weekends again!

Is Gabapentin for Migraines Right for Me?

In the quest to find effective preventive migraine treatments, healthcare providers sometimes prescribe medications “off-label.” In these cases, a drug has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for one disorder, but has been found to have positive effects on an unrelated one.

Gabapentin is one such drug. It’s an anti-seizure drug sometimes used to prevent migraines, though there is conflicting scientific evidence supporting its effectiveness in this regard.

In the United States, gabapentin is sold in generic form and under the brand names Neurontin, Gralise, Horizant, and Neuraptine.

Gabapentin has an average rating of 8.0 out of 10 from a total of 105 ratings for the treatment of Migraine. 80% of reviewers reported a positive effect, while 11% reported a negative effect.

As a migraine sufferer since I was 13 yrs old. I am now 56 yrs old. I tried it all. Imitrex, Fiorinol, Maxalt, Fioricet, Relpax, Zomig, Treximet, Cafergot, you name it. Sometimes I ended up in the E.R for a shot of Toradol. Finally I saw a general practitioner. He put me on gabapentin, 400 mg 3x a day. What a miracle. I’ve been on it for over a year now and been TOTALLY headache free. Wish all my other doctors were up with this. Would have saved me a lot of suffering.

Gabapentin is available in a generic version but also comes under the brand names of Horizant, Neurontin, and Gralise. It’s available orally as a liquid solution, capsule, or tablet for extended or immediate release. It can be taken with or without food.

How It Works

Gabapentin is actually an anticonvulsant drug. It’s usually used as a seizure preventative for patients with epilepsy, or to alleviate the nerve pain of shingles. Anticonvulsants are a class of drugs designed to soothe nerve impulses. However, gabapentin is sometimes used for migraine prophylaxis (or prevention).

The precise mechanism of gabapentin’s action is not well known. Even though this drug has a similar structure to a brain neurotransmitter called GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid), it has no effect on its receptors. It is believed that gabapentin blocks calcium channels, modulating the release of excitatory neurotransmitters.

Gabapentin and Migraine Prevention

Being an anticonvulsant, the theory behind using gabapentin for migraines is that its ability to calm nerve impulses could help avert migraine pain. Gabapentin could ease the brain’s electrical activities by settling excitatory neurotransmitters and blocking calcium channels.

However, this is mostly theoretical. Gabapentin’s exact role in migraine prevention isn’t well understood by researchers, and more research is needed to figure out what makes it work.

Gabapentin isn’t usually prescribed as a primary migraine preventative. It’s typically added to work in conjunction with other therapies, or used when other medications haven’t worked for the patient. As a preventative measure rather than an acute treatment, gabapentin needs to be taken continuously.

Gabapentin for Migraines Is an “Off-Label” Use

When a drug is used for something other than its purpose approved by the FDA, it’s called an off-label use. Since the FDA regulates the approval and testing of drugs (and not how doctors choose to prescribe them), your doctor is allowed to prescribe gabapentin for migraines if it seems like the right solution.

Gabapentin is primarily used to treat epilepsy in people older than 12 and partial seizures in children ages 3 to 12. It is also FDA-approved to treat a condition called postherpetic neuralgia—the nerve-related pain complication of a herpes zoster attack (shingles) that can occur in adults.3

Besides these uses, gabapentin is used off-label for a variety of other conditions like migraine prevention, as well as diabetic neuropathy, restless legs syndrome, and fibromyalgia.

Because of its benefit in treating these and other issues, gabapentin is what’s known as an adjuvant analgesic—a drug that can help control pain, despite it not being primarily intended to do so. Gabapentin may be used alone or with other medications when necessary.

It’s important to note, however, that The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) and the American Headache Society (AHS) do not list gabapentin as “effective” or “probably effective” for preventing migraines in their 2012 guidelines. Instead, gabapentin is given a level U rating, which means the evidence is conflicting or inadequate to support or refute its use for migraine prevention.

Gabapentin for Migraine Dosages

The recommended daily dose for gabapentin usually falls between 300 mg and 3,600 mg. Your dose may depend on your overall health, age, and other conditions.

 

While gabapentin is prescribed under the care of a doctor, be careful to take only the recommended amount, and talk to your doctor about how to wean off of it if that becomes necessary.

What the Research Says

The research behind gabapentin for migraines is a bit mixed, but does show some promise.

The American Academy of Neurology (AAN) released a statement in 2013 which said there was insufficient evidence supporting gabapentin for migraine prophylaxis.

In 2014, a study conducted on gabapentin for episodic migraine found that some other antiepileptic drugs could be considered first-line migraine preventatives, but found inadequate evidence to recommend gabapentin for migraine prevention, saying it’s “not effective and commonly causes adverse effects.”

A 2016 study of gabapentin for headache disorders did reveal some benefit. However, it stopped short of recommending it as a primary migraine therapy.

How should I take gabapentin?

Take gabapentin exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not take in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

If your doctor changes your brand, strength, or type of gabapentin, your dosage needs may change. Ask your pharmacist if you have any questions about the new kind of gabapentin you receive at the pharmacy.

Both Gralise and Horizant should be taken with food.

Neurontin can be taken with or without food.

If you break a Neurontin tablet and take only half of it, take the other half at your next dose. Any tablet that has been broken should be used as soon as possible or within a few days.

Swallow the capsule or tablet whole and do not crush, chew, break, or open it.

Measure liquid medicine carefully. Use the dosing syringe provided, or use a medicine dose-measuring device (not a kitchen spoon).

Do not stop taking this medicine suddenly, even if you feel fine. Stopping suddenly may cause increased seizures. Follow your doctor’s instructions about tapering your dose.

In case of emergency, wear or carry medical identification to let others know you have seizures.

This medicine can cause unusual results with certain medical tests. Tell any doctor who treats you that you are using gabapentin.

Store both the tablets and capsules at room temperature away from light and moisture.

Store the liquid medicine in the refrigerator. Do not freeze.

Dosing information

Usual Adult Dose for Epilepsy:

Initial dose: 300 mg orally on day one, 300 mg orally 2 times day on day two, then 300 mg orally 3 times a day on day three
Maintenance dose: 300 to 600 mg orally 3 times a day
Maximum dose: 3600 mg orally daily (in 3 divided doses)
-Maximum time between doses in the 3 times a day schedule should not exceed 12 hours

-The safety and effectiveness of gabapentin available under the trade name Gralise or Horizant in patients with epilepsy has not been studied.

Use: Adjunctive therapy in the treatment of partial onset seizures, with and without secondary generalization

Usual Adult Dose for Postherpetic Neuralgia:

-Initial dose: 300 mg orally on day one, 300 mg orally 2 times day on day two, then 300 mg orally 3 times a day on day three
-Titrate up as needed for pain relief
-Maximum dose: 1800 mg per day (600 mg orally 3 times a day)
Gabapentin available under the trade name Gralise:
-Maintenance dose: Gralise should be titrated to 1800 mg orally once daily with the evening meal.
-Recommended titration schedule:
Day 1: 300 mg orally with the evening meal
Day 2: 600 mg orally with the evening meal
Days 3 through 6: 900 mg orally with the evening meal
Days 7 through 10: 1200 mg orally with the evening meal
Days 11 through 14: 1500 mg orally with the evening meal
Day 15: 1800 mg orally with the evening meal

COMMENT:
-Gralise is not interchangeable with other gabapentin products because of differing pharmacokinetic profiles that affect the frequency of administration.

Gabapentin enacarbil extended release tablets are available under the trade name Horizant:
-The recommended dosage is 600 mg orally 2 times a day. Therapy should be initiated at a dose of 600 mg orally in the morning for 3 days of therapy, then increased to 600 mg 2 times a day (1200 mg/day) on day four.

COMMENT:
Gabapentin enacarbil extended release tablets available under the trade name Horizant and gabapentin are not interchangeable.

Use: Postherpetic neuralgia

Usual Adult Dose for Restless Legs Syndrome:

Gabapentin enacarbil available under the trade name Horizant:
600 mg orally once daily with food at about 5 PM

Use: For the treatment of moderate-to-severe primary Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS) in adults

Usual Pediatric Dose for Epilepsy:

Less than 3 years: Not recommended

Greater than or equal to 3 and less than 12 years:
Starting Dose: Ranges from 10 to 15 mg/kg/day in 3 divided doses
Effective Dose: Reached by upward titration over a period of approximately 3 days; the effective dose in patients 5 years of age and older is 25 to 35 mg/kg/day in divided doses (3 times a day). The effective dose in pediatric patients ages 3 and 4 years is 40 mg/kg/day and given in divided doses (3 times a day). Gabapentin may be administered as the oral solution, capsule, or tablet, or using combinations of these formulations. Dosages up to 50 mg/kg/day have been well tolerated in a long term clinical study. The maximum time interval between doses should not exceed 12 hours.

Greater than 12 years:
-Initial dose: 300 mg orally on day one, 300 mg orally 2 times a day on day two, then 300 mg orally 3 times a day on day three
-Maintenance dose: 900 to 1800 mg orally in 3 divided doses; the dose may be increased up to 1800 mg/day. Dosages up to 2400 mg/day have been well tolerated in long term clinical studies. Doses of 3600 mg/day have also been administered to a small number of patients for a relatively short duration, and have been well tolerated. The maximum time between doses in the three times a day schedule should not exceed 12 hours.

Use: Adjunctive therapy in the treatment of partial onset seizures, with and without secondary generalization in patients 3 years of age and older

Side Effects of Gabapentin

LIke many other FDA-approved drugs, gabapentin could have side effects for many patients. Those include:

    • Swelling of feet or limbs
    • Unexpected or atypical eye movements
    • Loss of coordination
    • Blurry vision or other vision changes

Better Options for Migraine Prevention

There are plenty of migraine preventative drugs on the market which you can discuss with your doctor.

And as you probably know, living a healthy lifestyle could also help you reduce the migraine attacks you have to endure. Getting plenty of sleep, a healthy diet, and physical activity are all important.

Many migraine relief tools could reduce your suffering when you’re hit with a migraine, or help ward off more of them. These include supplemental Vitamin B2 and magnesium, which could help reduce migraine frequency. Axon Optics glasses, which have been shown to help 85% of users, are at the top of our list.

Interactions

Drinking alcohol may make some side effects of gabapentin more severe.

Types of drugs that are known to interact with gabapentin and may cause problems include:

    • Opiate pain medications, including Vicodin (hydrocodone) and morphine, among others
    • Naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, and others)
    • Medications used for heartburn, including Mylanta, Maalox, and cimetidine

If you do dipstick tests to check your urine for protein, tell your healthcare provider. Gabapentin may affect the results.

Your healthcare provider can advise you on whether you should avoid taking certain drugs with gabapentin entirely, or if the timing or dosage simply need to be adjusted.

Gabapentin
Gabapentin

Contraindications

Currently, there is not enough research or well-controlled studies on humans to deem this medication safe for expecting mothers.3  Contact your healthcare provider to discuss whether the benefits of use may outweigh the risks in your case.

Gababentin should be avoided by people with chronic kidney disease or myasthenia gravis.

Does gabapentin help nerve pain?

Gabapentin is approved to treat the type of nerve pain (neuralgia) that results from nerve damage. Gabapentin is used to treat neuralgia caused by a herpes zoster viral infection, also known as shingles. This pain is called post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN), and it can be severe and chronic. Gabapentin is also used to treat pain from diabetic neuropathy, which happens when nerves in the feet damaged by diabetes cause chronic burning pain.

The exact way that gabapentin works to relieve pain is not known. It may change the way the body senses and reacts to pain. Gabapentin is used to manage long-term (chronic) pain, not to be taken for pain as needed. Chronic pain can interfere with sleep and work, and lead to depression.

Studies show that pain relief may start within one week and reach a maximum effect in about 4 weeks. It can take this long because gabapentin is usually started at a low dose and gradually increased over time until it works.

For treating neuralgia, gabapentin is often started at 300 mg per day and gradually raised by 300 mg per day. One 2017 review of 37 studies found that pain relief usually occurs at a dose of 1,200 mg or more.

The same review compared gabapentin to an inactive medicine (placebo) in almost 6,000 adults with chronic pain from PHN or diabetic neuropathy. Study participants were given either gabapentin or a placebo for 4 to at least 12 weeks. The results showed that 30-40% of people taking gabapentin were able to reduce their pain by half or more, compared to 10-20% of people taking the placebo.

Although some people may get significant relief, others may have side effects without relief of pain. More than half of people taking gabapentin did not get significant relief and had side effects from the drug.

According to the review, about 60% of people taking gabapentin had side effects, including:

    • Dizziness
    • Sleepiness
    • Water retention (edema)
    • Clumsiness while walking (ataxia)

It does not typically make pain worse: In trials comparing gabapentin side effects to placebo side effects, only 1% of people reported increased pain, and this was the same for gabapentin and placebo.

Once you find the dose that relieves neuralgia for you, it is important not to stop taking it suddenly. Stopping suddenly can lead to withdrawal symptoms such as:

    • Anxiety
    • Insomnia
    • Nausea
    • Pain
    • Sweating

Managing Migraine Headaches

Migraine All kinds of Headache can literally bring your existence to a halt. Anybody who has ever experienced the pain triggered by a migraine will completely realize this statement.

Often involving only one side of the head, these All kinds of Headache could be extremely debilitating for the sufferer. They are able to make you nauseous, as well as be painful to the point that you simply vomit. Episodes can last from 12 to 72 hours, with small or no relief.

Many individuals experience an aura at the onset of a migraine. ” Lightning flashes” observed within the corner of the eye, dizziness, blurred or double vision, and nausea are a couple of from the classic tell-tale signs that a migraine is about to happen.

The pain is extreme, and a single will become ultra sensitive to sights and sounds. Light of any sort is excruciating. Individuals will usually need to lie down in a darkened, quiet room although they wait for that headache to subside.

Many women begin to encounter migraines because they go via menopause. They may have never had a migraine in their life, but discover that they are regular during this time. There’s no known reason why this would begin to occur only at this time of life. Frequently times the trigger is tension related, but might be brought on by particular points that a single eats. Physical illness might be an additional trigger, but no one knows for particular.

Medications are available to avoid migraine All kinds of Headache, or to relieve symptoms after the onset. Numerous individuals end up within the emergency room of the hospital considering that they are getting a stroke if the migraine is severe sufficient.

The signs and symptoms of blurred vision accompanied by the extreme head pain lead some people to think which they may have a brain tumor. Your doctor will most likely order an MRI to rule this out.

In case you endure from frequent migraines, lie down and use a cold compress on the forehead and also the back of your neck. Caffeine will also help to relieve the signs and symptoms by dilating the blood vessels.

Often a physician will prescribe certain drugs which are also utilized to deal with higher blood pressure, because they seem to possess an impact on the frequency and intensity of the migraine. Known as calcium channel blockers and Beta blockers, they’ve been utilized with some success within the past. These are used as preventive measures.

Your physician will operate with you to attempt to lessen the frequency from the migraines, even though some individuals will continue to have as numerous as 5 or 6 a week. Depending on how frequently you’ll have them is not something that can be predicted. Attempt to determine what it’s that you simply were performing before the headache occurred. Keep a list of things you consume that appear to precipitate the migraine.

Maintain your physician informed of your findings. By discovering out what the trigger from the migraines is will help to control them. even though the natural ways does not assist you to control the migraines, you will find medications on the market these days that a physician can prescribe to assist deal with the migraines. With that becoming said if you can control them without drug then it is suggested to do so.

Preventive Migraine Medications

These meds can:

      • Help you have fewer migraines.
      • Make your headaches less severe.
      • Make them shorter.

This type of treatment can help if you get migraines often.

You may want to consider preventive medications if:

      • The drugs you take to relieve your migraines don’t help or you have bad side effects from them.
      • You have 4 or more migraines a month.

The drugs that are used to prevent migraine include:

Anti-seizure drugs. These meds may work by calming nerve cells in the brain.

They include:

      • Gabapentin (Gralise, Horizant, Neurontin)
      • Topiramate (Qudexy XR,Trokendi XR, Topamax)
      • Valproic acid (Depakene, Depakote, Stavzor)
Beta-blockers usually treat high blood pressure and heart disease. It’s not clear how they help prevent migraines. Some that work for these headaches include:

      • Atenolol (Tenormin)
      • Metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL)
      • Nadolol (Corgard)
      • Propranolol (Inderal, Innopran XL)
      • Timolol

Antidepressants. These medications affect the level of the brain chemical serotonin, which may be linked to migraines. Some of them, such as amitriptyline and venlafaxine, can help keep the headaches away. Other kinds may work, too.

CGRP Inhibitors: CGRP (calcitonin gene-related peptide) is a molecule involved in causing migraine pain. CGRP inhibitors are a class of drugs that block the effects of CGRP. They are specifically approved to prevent migraine attacks. You give yourself an injection once a month with a pen-like device. In clinical trials, people consistently had one to two fewer migraine days a month than those who took placebo. Mild pain and redness at the injection site are the most common side effects. These drugs are:

      • Atogepant (Qulipta)
      • Eptinezumab (Vyepti)
      • Erenumab (Aimovig)
      • Fremanezumab (Ajovy)
      • Galcanezumab (Emgality)

Atogepant (Qulipta) can be taken orally. Eptinezumab (Vyepti) is taken as an IV infusion every three months. Fremanezumab (Ajovy) can be taken every three months or once a month. For the others, you give yourself.

Triptans for menstrual-related migraines. These drugs treat migraines when they’re already happening, but one — frovatriptan (Frova) — may help prevent migraines that women get because of their menstrual cycle. The medicine affects serotonin levels and may also relieve pain in other ways.Botulinum toxin (Botox). Often used to treat wrinkles, it also helps some people who get migraines at least 15 days per month, called chronic migraines. It’s for people who have long-term migraine headaches, with the attack lasting 4 hours at a time or longer. Doctors think Botox may keep the brain from giving off chemicals that the body uses to send pain signals.

When you take medication to prevent migraines, keep these tips in mind:

    • Your doctor will likely start you on a low dose and gradually increase it over time. It may take several months to find the best dose with the fewest side effects.
    • Don’t suddenly stop taking preventive medications. That could trigger a rebound headache. If you do need to stop taking them, you’ll need to gradually taper off under your doctor’s care.
    • These meds probably won’t completely get rid of your headaches. You may still need to take medicine when you do have one.
If you can’t take medication or wish not to, a device might be worth considering. Cefaly is a portable headband-like device that gives electrical impulses on the skin at the forehead. This stimulates a nerve associated with migraine headaches. Cefaly is used once a day for 20 minutes, and when it’s on you may feel a tingling or massaging sensation.SpringTM may be another option. You hold this device at the back of your head at the first sign of a headache, and it gives off a magnetic pulse that stimulates part of the brain. In addition, there is a noninvasive vagus nerve stimulator called gammaCore. When placed over the vagus nerve in the neck, it releases a mild electrical stimulation to the nerve’s fibers to relieve pain. Nerivio is a wireless remote electrical neuromoduat home.

What Medicines Are Good for Treating Headaches ?

When headache pain has you in its grip, a fast-acting headache remedy is a top priority. Some headache remedies come in the form of medication. But there are also many ways to achieve natural headache relief. Feeling better may require a combination of treatments.

Medications

Headache remedies for migraine headaches are usually prescription drugs, such as:

    • beta blockers: atenolol (Tenormin); bisoprolol (Zebeta)
    • tricyclics: amitriptyline (Elavil, Endep); doxepin (Adapin, Sinequan)
    • calcium-channel blockers: verapamil (Calan, Isoptin, Verelan)
    • anticonvulsants: divalproex (Depakote); gabapentin (Neurontin); topimirate (Topamax)
    • triptans: almotriptan (Axert); eletriptan (Relpax); sumatriptan (Imitrex).

Triptans are meant for acute treatment of migraines, while all the other categories are meant for chronic prevention of migraines.

You must talk to a doctor in order to get a prescription. The drugs are not available over the counter.

While there are also prescription medications for other types of headaches, such as tension headaches or sinus headaches, over-the-counter (OTC) headache remedies may be enough to relieve the pain they bring. OTC pills are available without a prescription, but as the Harvard Medical School Special Health Report Headaches: Relieving and preventing migraines and other headaches notes, they are medications and must be used carefully.

  • Acetaminophen (Tylenol and others) is a generally safe non-aspirin headache remedy. But doses above 3 grams per day, especially when combined with alcohol, can cause potentially fatal liver damage. If you consume three or more alcoholic drinks a day, every day, don’t take acetaminophen.

  • Aspirin quells pain and may prevent migraine headaches in some people when taken regularly. Long-term side effects include kidney damage and gastrointestinal problems, such as stomach pain, heartburn, or nausea. Bleeding from the stomach can also occur, often in such minute quantities as to go unnoticed. However, over time anemia may result, causing fatigue— which, in turn, may increase the frequency of headaches. Avoid aspirin if you have reflux, gastritis, or ulcers.
  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) include aspirin, ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen sodium (Aleve, Anaprox), and ketoprofen (Actron, Orudis, others). In some people, NSAIDs help prevent migraine headaches. Their long-term side effects are similar to those for aspirin.

Most healthy people who have mild to moderately painful headaches once in a while can take OTC headache remedies. But if you need to take an OTC painkiller several times a week, you should see your doctor.

Natural Headache Relief

Some people feel more comfortable seeking natural headache relief, in the form of plant-based or mineral supplements. Some of the most widely used preparations include:

      • Butterbur, an herb derived from plants in the genus Petasites
      • Feverfew, A daisy-like flower native to Europe
      • Peppermint oil, a culinary herb
      • Magnesium, a mineral
      • Coenzyme Q10 , an enzyme found in mitochondria, the energy factories of our cells
      • Vitamin B12

Consult your doctor before taking any of these supplements, as they can interact with medications to treat headaches or other conditions. The FDA does not regulate the effectiveness or safety of these products.

Activities that help

You may need more than just a pill for a headache remedy. Certain activities are also effective at relieving pain. For example, half of all headache sufferers in the United States use some type of mind-body technique to alleviate the pain. These include:

      • meditation
      • relaxation techniques, such as deep breathing
      • yoga
      • hypnosis, a state of deep relaxation that is similar to being in a trance
      • stress management

These mind-body therapies can help lower stress, a widely accepted headache trigger, and they also promote healthier lifestyle habits, such as getting adequate sleep, to keep headaches at bay.

Exercise, if performed regularly, is another natural headache remedy. It helps keep the heart and blood vessels healthy. It also boosts your mood, relieves stress, and helps prevent a host of ailments, such as high blood pressure.

Other natural headache relief

If your own natural headache remedies aren’t effective, consider alternatives, such as:

    1. Acupuncture: According to traditional Chinese beliefs, acupuncture works by affecting the flow of energy through pathways that run through the body.
    2. Psychotherapy: This can help you manage the effects that headaches have on your life, as well as the stresses and anxieties that may aggravate your pain.
    3. Physical therapy: This can provide relief for tension headaches and migraines by relaxing the tense muscles that commonly accompany tension and migraine headaches.

Seeking professional help

If headaches occur on a regular basis, it’s important to speak to your doctor, to see if an underlying condition is to blame, such as a medication side effect or a blood vessel abnormality.

Start with your primary care physician. You may be referred to a neurologist, who might order tests based on your symptoms. Once you have a diagnosis of the causes of your headaches, your doctor will be able to help you devise strategies for effective headache remedies.

What is Fioricet (Butalbital APAP Caffeine) and What is the Side Effects of Fioricet ?

If you’re struggling with constant headaches, your doctor might prescribe you a medication called Fioricet (Butalbital APAP Caffeine).

This proprietary, brand name medication is actually a combination of other medications. The basic component is, surprisingly enough, acetaminophen, a common pain relieving medication that you can easily get over the counter. Because it’s mixed with another powerful medication, though, it’s something that you can only get by prescription.

The second ingredient in this medication is Butalbital, which is a barbiturate, commonly used to relieve muscle tension. Since many of the worst headaches that you can get are actually caused by tense muscles in the neck and shoulders, this is a very helpful addition to a very helpful pain killer.

The formulation of this medication is accentuated with a dose of caffeine. Although caffeine doesn’t necessarily stop headaches, it does have an effect on the central nervous system. It stimulates the veins and relaxes them, allowing blood to flow more freely. This, in and of itself, can have a mild pain relieving effect on headaches. However, it’s mainly useful because it can help the other two drugs to be delivered to the body’s various systems more easily.

Fioricet is a medication that you need a prescription for, but you don’t necessarily have to buy it through traditional pharmacies. These days, online pharmacies are very popular for buying medications like these. It’s easy because you don’t have to actually go anywhere to get your medications. They can be delivered right to your door for a minimal cost.

Before you purchase Fioricet(Butalbital APAP Caffeine) online, though, make sure that you’re getting it from a reputable online pharmacy where you are assured of the quality of your medication and the quantity you’re going to get.

One of the main advantages of buying online is that you can save money, too, but make sure you’re getting what you pay for with this medication.

Many people who purchase Fioricet(Butalbital APAP Caffeine) online find that they enjoy the utter privacy of it. No one needs to know that you’re suffering from headaches, but you can get relief easily and quickly by having your medication delivered to your door. One you start taking this medication, you’ll see just how quickly and effectively it works on headaches of all sorts, and you’ll be able to get rid of your headaches more efficiently than ever before.

Common and Rare Side Effects of Fioricet

Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

More common

Light headedness

shortness of breath

Incidence not known

Abdominal or stomach pain

black, tarry stools

bleeding gums

blistering, peeling, or loosening of the skin

blood in the urine or stools

blurred vision

change in the frequency of urination or amount of urine

chills

cough

diarrhea

difficulty with breathing

difficulty with swallowing

dizziness

drowsiness

dry mouth

fainting

fast, pounding, or irregular heartbeat or pulse

flushed or dry skin

fruit-like breath odor

hives, itching, or skin rash

increased hunger

increased thirst

increased urination

joint or muscle pain

loss of appetite

nausea or vomiting

pinpoint red spots on the skin

puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips, or tongue

red skin lesions, often with a purple center

red, irritated eyes

seizures

shakiness in the legs, arms, hands, or feet

sore throat

sores, ulcers, or white spots in the mouth or on the lips

sweating

swelling of the feet or lower legs

tightness in the chest

trembling or shaking of the hands or feet

troubled breathing

unexplained weight loss

unusual bleeding or bruising

unusual tiredness or weakness

weakness

Get emergency help immediately if any of the following symptoms of overdose occur:

Symptoms of overdose

Confusion as to time, place, or person

dark urine

difficult or painful urination

dizziness, faintness, or lightheadedness when getting up suddenly from a lying or sitting position

fever

general feeling of discomfort or illness

hallucinations

headache

holding false beliefs that cannot be changed by fact

increased sweating

irregular, fast or slow, or shallow breathing

light-colored stools

loss of appetite

pale or blue lips, fingernails, or skin

restlessness

sudden decrease in the amount of urine

sweating

trouble sleeping

unpleasant breath odor

unusual excitement, nervousness, or restlessness

vomiting of blood

yellow eyes or skin

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common

Relaxed and calm

sleepiness

Incidence not known

Anxiety

bloated

constipation

continuing ringing or buzzing or other unexplained noise in the ears

depression

earache

excess air or gas in the stomach or intestines

false or unusual sense of well-being

full feeling

hearing loss

heartburn

heavy eyelids

high energy

hot spells

hyperventilation

irritability

numbness

pain in the leg

passing gas

sluggishness

stuffy nose

tingling sensation

Other side effects not listed may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.